Life can be unpredictable at times. A visitation schedule that was set months or years ago may no longer work for a present-day routine, and right now that is playing out with how some parents interpret “spring break.”

When the governor ordered Texas schools to begin their spring vacations early, some took this action to mean that the “spring break” plans they made with their co-parents had altered in their favor. The courts have issued an order saying in no uncertain terms that it had not. Still, this means that there are many co-parents confronting a quite trying situation, and that is not easy.

What does “in their favor” favor mean?

Often where spring break, or any planned school vacation, is concerned, co-parents will agree that their children will stay with one parent or the other for that period of time. In this case, some parents who would have custody during the break have assumed that the change means they will have custody from the new start ordered by the governor until the end of the original spring break.

Why this declaration matters

Co-parenting is a delicate situation. Most parents put in a lot of work to make that relationship function to the best of their ability. That does not mean, however, that one party or the other might not take an “opportuniy

If you’re put in this trying situation, you now can protect your time with your child through such actions as:

  • Potential enforcement actions
  • Habeas actions
  • Significant penalties from the court

The most crucial point to remember here is your parenting time has protections.

“In the spirit of compromise…”

It is not fun to be the bigger person. It is not satisfying to take the higher road. However, if your co-parent unilaterally uses a difficult situation to manipulate your agreements, you don’t have to stand for it. You can get representation that will prioritize your interests and your needs.